Blog Archives

Help fund the 10th Leeds Brownies trip to London!

browniesOur good friend and Eagle Owl @BookElfLeeds is raising money for her Brownies. Here’s why

When we asked our Brownies what they really wanted to do this year, they told us they wanted to visit London.

We’re a Leeds Brownie unit, based in LS4/LS6, for whom money is tight, and we’d love to give our girls, aged 7-11, the trip of their lives. For most of them it will be their first time visiting London, for some their first time away from home.

We’d love to make this as cheap a trip as possible so that ALL our Brownies can join us, and for that to happen we need your help!

Funds will go initially to cover transport and accommodation costs, and to buy food for the girls. If there is any left over we’d love to have some thing special to look forward to, any suggestions let us know!

We’re travelling down in February. The girls are planning a fundraising Christmas Fair (more details as and when) and our plucky Eagle Owl Jess is going to complete the Leeds Country Way-a 63 round trip all around Leeds-all to raise money.

If you can spare a fiver, that would pay for tea for one of the girls. We’re grateful for every penny and will keep updates on things we’re planning, and let you know how the trip goes!

You’ll be making twenty little girl’s wishes come true with every donation-on behalf of them all THANK YOU for your very kind donations.

If you have a moment, please check out the JustGiving page here!

Convinced? Donate HERE!

 

PROMO – Open Letters at Hyde Park Book Club

Recently I received an email from Open Letters – letting us know about their upcoming event. We both attended MINIcine at few months back for Never Let Me Go, so they immediately thought of book club when laundching their own literary based event!

Looks like it could be a giggle – do report back if you attend!

OPEN LETTERS

Facebook PAGE 

Date: 13th of July 2016

Time: 7:30 pm

Venue: Hyde Park Book Club

Contact: openlettersleeds @ gmail.com

 

AN EVENING OF LETTERS, READ ALOUD.
Fiction & Nonfiction.
Open Mic: bring a letter to a person, place, or thing. read it aloud.

We will also write letters.
Paper & envelopes will be provided.

FREE EVENT

PODCAST – Never Let Me Go – with MINIcine

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From MINICINE

Director Mark Romanek and writer Alex Garland (Ex Machina) bring Kazuo Ishiguro’s (‘The Remains of the Day’) hauntingly poignant and emotional story to the screen. In this remarkable tale of love, loss and hidden truths, Kathy (Carey Mulligan), Tommy (Andrew Garfield) and Ruth (Keira Knightley) live in a world and a time that feel familiar to us, but are not quite like anything we know. They spend their childhood at Hailsham, a seemingly idyllic English boarding school. When they leave the shelter of the school and the terrible truth of their fate is revealed to them, they must also confront the deep feelings of love, jealousy and betrayal that threaten to pull them apart.

 

After the recent showing of Never Let Me Go (part of the Human Nature season) by @MinicineYorks, we held an after film discussion comparing the book to the film.

The sound is a tiny bit hollow but the chat was ace!

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LBC and the MINIcine crew! Check out the cake!! It was awesome!

Mobile Link

Trailer

minicineVenue: Armley Mills Industrial Museum
Canal Road
Leeds
West Yorkshire
LS12 2QF

Website: minicine.org.uk

Twitter: @MinicineYorks

Podcasts

 

LBC White Swan – The Chaos of Stars – Write Up

LBC White Swan

Date:  Sunday 9th of November 2015
Time:  6:00pm
Address: Swan Street, Leeds

Discussing:

THE CHAOS OF STARS

KIERSTEN WHITE

* * * * * SPOILERS * * * * *

* * * * * SPOILERS * * * * *

* * * * * SPOILERS * * * * *

 

BLURB

Isadora’s family is seriously screwed up—which comes with the territory when you’re the human daughter of the Egyptian gods Isis and Osiris.

Isadora is tired of her immortal relatives and their ancient mythological drama, so when she gets the chance to move to California with her brother, she jumps on it.

But her new life comes with plenty of its own dramatic—and dangerous—complications . . . and Isadora quickly learns there’s no such thing as a clean break from family.

REVIEW

the chaos of starsOur last meeting for 2015 and it was SUCH a laugh. So much so that I’ve committed not only to a Christmas Read-a-Long, but also a Christmas party (details will be posted on the blog when I’ve…you know…arranged them).

It was even better because the book just didn’t work for us and we as we were all of a mind; we could indulge our ranty selves. OK, that was just me, but we all of us just let it all out.

On the plus side; this is a surprisingly quick read – most of us read it in one or two sessions. It’s also a  page turner with only one member deciding not to finish it. It is also NOT the start of a trilogy. And for most of us, that was very good news.  I noted that it might be a good introductory book for YA who don’t enjoy reading, though this was countered*.

The dream sequences were interesting. I for one could have used more dreams and more familial history.

Another book clubber noted that the author had hoped to explore that period when teenagers learn that their parents are fallible; to articulate the conflicting emotions that can arise. Which is laudable. Good intentions and all.

Oh and there was no genuine stalking behaviour across the book. At no point did the primary male character follow the protagonist, or break into her bedroom, or restrain her. This was good. Seriously, as a book club; we’ve read quite a bit of YA fiction and to say we’ve been unimpressed by the prevalence of stalking as a POSITIVE undersells it somewhat. For the most part, characters interacted with one another as peers which would have been refreshing had it been better executed.

On the other hand…the reason that this was such a quick read was because the language was very basic. There was nothing challenging whatsoever in terms of this book.

As a book club, we’ve encountered quite a few books based on ancient myths. Perhaps the best received of these was American Gods by Neil Gaiman, closely followed by The Song of Achilles by Madelaine Miller. Many of us had also read one or the other of the Joanne Harris mythical books (Rune Marks and the Gospel of Loki). We all felt that this is a particularly fertile genera of fiction at the moment and that – at their essence – they can be assessed by how well portrayed the pantheons of Gods are and well developed the characters are.

We felt like this book was on very solid ground as a concept. Egypt – long a fascination for those of us in the Western World – has gone through a period of immense political and social upheaval. That’s before you take into account that Egypt is now predominantly Muslim and the fascinating intersections that could have been included. At every level, we thought that this book demonstrated a considerable lack of sensitivity in failing to even acknowledge the country that the book ostensibly opens in. Without any grounding or cultural exploration; the setting and nationality felt – at best – underdeveloped and tokenistic and – at worst – completely exploitative.

Regarding how the gods are portrayed; the primary character refers to her brother as Whore-Us the entire time. That’s one of the more mature depictions.

The misfires just kept on coming. With Egyptian and Greek Gods interacting, one might have expected a huge cultural clash or exchange or ANYTHING but – aside from increasingly stereotypical and one-dimensional portrayals – no; for some reason we were denied this interesting avenue. Instead, every conclusion reached was one predicted by us within the first few chapters. Not a single unexpected event, line of dialogue or act came as a surprise to any of us.

I don’t know anything about the author. This could have been a culture that she genuinely feels a connection to, but sadly that didn’t translate onto the page. It felt like the plot was all pre-set and the culture determined later and written in afterwards. Everything about this is homogeneous, not based in any sort of specific culture. At one point a reference is made to an ancient Egyptian language. It’s not even named, which just came across as both disrespectful and lazy writing. At another point – after the plot pointlessly pulls Isodora out of Egypt and sends her to San Francisco FOR NO REAL REASON WHATSOEVER – a character named Taylor comments to her that she looks as though pulled out of an exhibition and how Taylor wishes that she had a culture. We settled on the phrase othering and fetishizing that to boot over outright racism.

Isadora is beyond flimsy as a character. It is possible to have characters that – through no fault of their own – are oblivious to what is going on around them. We didn’t think that was the case here. Isodora is a character that it was difficult to made anything of. Her lack of maturity, inability to interact with her family in an honest or open way and selfishness might have felt like a realistic portrayal of a teenager if it weren’t coupled with an arrogant fatalism, utter entitlement and not-very-brightness. She never really sees what’s going on around her which was irritating as most of us figured out the Big Bad on the page that they were introduced. All together though, she is a pill.

One of the book clubbers positioned that Isadora’s parents might not have been well developed characters because Isadora never truly understood their motives. Others felt that the clubber was searching for a nuance that the writing did not suggest likely.

And for the record; museums – especially ones with famous priceless Egyptian artifacts arriving – don’t give keys to 16 year olds. Ever. And they don’t hold exhibitions like that either.

At least one of us felt that if she had read it at 13 years, she’d have enjoyed it. The thing is; I know that this reads harsh. We were harsh, but we were also genuinely frustrated. There were so many potentially great ideas briefly brought up and then discarded – many of them would have made really good tales. And as I mentioned above, we do actually read a lot of books written for younger readers (because we clearly do HUGE amounts of research for book club, many of us don’t realise that it’s YA until we’ve started it) and we take that into account when it comes to scoring. Also, we have an inherent respect for anyone who puts pen to page and actually creates something – we always have. That might not have been so clear in the write up but in person we did acknowledge that a few times (and we were in high spirits and good moods – all coming from a good place).

This isn’t an ‘evil’ book; it’s not even a terrible one. It’s merely bland. A beach read that you pick up, finish and forget all in a day.

*It was countered by saying that foisting this book on a YA might convince them never to read another book again. Which is harsh. But probably fair.

SCORE

3.25 out of 10

For further details, please email me at leedsbookclub@gmail.com or tweet me @LeedsBookClub

The Pub can be contacted on @WhiteSwanLeeds

And feel free to let us know your thoughts using #LBCWSwan!

Culturally Minded Podcast

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Leeds Book Club has been participating in the Arts and Minds Network‘s Sharing Stories Project for the last few years.
This project has been set up to raise awareness of mental health; learning difficulties and autism through – in our case – the depiction of these in works of fiction.
In previous years, we read and discussed books – you can find the list below – however, in 2015, we decided to broaden our scope.
Tom of the Arts and Mind Network and I will be meeting up every few months to discuss books, music, TV, films, comics and anything else we can think of, with an eye towards increasing awareness about mental health.
If you are already subscribed to the Leeds Book Club podcast, then   #CulturallyMinded episodes should start appearing automatically soon! 😉

itunesThe LBC podcast can also be found on iTunes here if you fancy subscribing!

 

01 – CULTURALLY MINDED – Episode One – with Tom – “Structured yet nicely vague…|

Where we say hello and discuss our ideas and hopes for the podcast; how we define culture and cultural snobbery(!) and different aspects of the arts, films, books, gardens and sculpture parks that have inspired us!

Tip 01 – West Yorkshire Sculpture Park or Hyde Park or any green place!

Mobile Link to the episode.

 

If you’d like to get involved – either recording (with us or as a roving reporter with audioboom) or with a suggested book, tv, film, comic or place to visit – please drop us a line!

MINICINE – Westworld

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Venue: Armley Mills Industrial Museum
Canal Road
Leeds
West Yorkshire
LS12 2QF

Twitter: @MinicineYorks

 

Just in this second from watching Westworld at Armley Mills, courtesy of MINICINE – my first time attending one of their events – despite best intentions.

The venue is absolutely amazing – a huge space – originally the world’s largest woolen mill – housing a museum, devoted to our collective industrial history. We were doing the quickstep through to make sure we were on time, but I will definitely be back to check out the exhibits in more detail. Particularly the Memoria – Memories of Light one that runs until October.

Our two hosts – (book clubber) Woody and Abby – were lovely, personable and welcoming, as well as being very well informed about the upcoming Fanorama event and the ongoing Scalarama festival  programme of events across the city. We opened with 4 shorts films ‘No Robots‘; ‘Cowboy, Clone, Dust‘; ‘(can’t think of the name right now)’ and my personal favourite ‘Wirecutters‘ (read more about Wirecutters here)

[youtube https://youtu.be/3Bs4LOtIuxg]

After the shorts, we had a brief intermission…with CAKE…tea and coffee were also available. Then we settled down for the main event.

Blurb

Westworld is a futuristic theme park where paying guests can pretend to be gunslingers in an artificial Wild West populated by androids. After paying a sizable entrance fee, Blane (James Brolin) and Martin (Richard Benjamin) are determined to unwind by hitting the saloons and shooting off their guns.

But when the system goes haywire and a guest is killed in a duel with a robotic gunslinger (Yul Brynner), Martin’s escapist fantasy suddenly takes on a grim reality.

I’m not going to do a review of the film here. It’s one that I’ve grown up with and I have a great deal of affection for it. Suffice to say that seeing it on a proper screen, with such a beautiful backdrop (red curtains!!), was really special. The whole night ran smooth as silk and when I say that I’m planning on becoming more involved with the indie scene – I mean that I’ve already bought tickets for my next event – Wayne’s World at Left Bank next week.

Party On Minicine!

Trailer

[youtube https://youtu.be/LcL3eP0Hfy4]

From the Minicine website

Scalarama is an annual celebration of cinema taking place every September. The season aims to unite all those who are passionate about showing films to one another, and to champion communal film watching and the cinema experience. Scalarama takes the form of a month long season of screenings taking place across the world at a wide range of venues, with all different types of exhibitors showcasing films from across the history of cinema and from all parts of the world.

A little info about Minicine

Since 2010, Minicine has been committed to screening the best independent and foreign language, cult and classic cinema that may not otherwise reach West Yorkshire audiences.

A non-for-profit, we currently screen every fourth Thursday of the month at The Palace Picturehouse in Armley Mills Industrial Museum. In the past we have held events in 51% Bourbon, The Maven and what was once Dock Street Market in Leeds city centre, as well as the Polish Parish Club in Bradford.

We try to offer our audience an alternative to the impersonal experience of the multiplex and offer short films and free refreshments at our events too, so if you like homemade cake we may just be the film society for you.

We prefer to inclusive and not exclusive so while we do offer membership Minicine has, is and always will be open to everybody.

We are a proud member of the British Federation of Film Societies and in 2012 we were awarded the BFFS Best Film Programming prize.

Cross-posted on Drneevil Notes

The Leeds Big Bookend Premiere of Drink with a Chimp and Festival Launch Party

The Leeds Big Bookend Premiere of Drink with a Chimp and Festival Launch Party, Thursday 4th June 2015

Join us from 2nd-10th June as we map Leeds.www.bigbookend.co.uk

Have you ever made a monkey of yourself?

A new play from Common Chorus

Common Chorus’ Drink With a Chimp is a new play about one woman’s struggle with addiction and her journey to recovery. Based on biographical stories from clients at the Spacious Places recovery centre, Sally’s story is one of loss and desperation, of hope and reconciliation to her long lost brother. This is a story about the realisation that recovery isn’t only about giving up drink and drugs, that’s just where it begins. As Sally discovers, recovery is a much bigger journey.

Drawing on the 12 step programme and Prof. Steve Peters’ The Chimp Paradox this is a story of hope for anyone who has ever wanted to be ‘better’.

Festival Launch Party

Join us for a complimentary drink in the bar of the Carriageworks Theatre at 7.00pm and meet the Big Bookend team whilst enjoying the music of singer song writer, Lisa Glover before the performance which starts at 7.45pm.

Tickets for the  Drink with a Chimp Première on 4th June and the second performance on Friday 5th June which is followed by a Q&A  from writer, Daniel Ingram-Brown, director,Simon Brewis and actor, Lynsey Jones, can be bought from the Carriageworks Theatre.Click here to buy your tickets, £6.00 / £8.00.

To download our programme and for all events and ticket information, visit our website, www.bigbookend.co.uk

Follow us on  Facebook/BigBookendand Twitter/BigBookend.

Copyright © 2015 The Big Bookend, All rights reserved.Our mailing address is:

info@bigbookend.co.uk

INTERVIEW – The Wood Beneath the World

twb inside the outside

The Wood Beneath The World is a large­scale, magical forest installation hidden in the depths of Leeds Town Hall Crypt, which has been growing silently for decades.

Its roots and trees have now burst through the floors and walls, and the wood has taken over…

the wood beneath the world - YEP

Rebekah Whitney (of Lord Whitney ) and Alexander Palmer (the Director of The Wood Beneath The World) were kind enough to sit down with me for a chat about a million years ago (before Christmas) about their hugely successful installation at Leeds Town Hall.

Originally, we were going to record the interview as a podcast. However, we had such good conversational fun that we sort of forgot that this was supposed to be an interview and began to talk over one another, interrupt, idea hop (where one person starts a sentence and it’s carried on by the others) and all those traits which sort of proves that a conversation is going Really Well...but makes for annoying listening!

On top of that, the project was still in full flight and the pair were obviously working all the hours in the day together. Thy’d created a sort of joint speak, where they knew each other so well that they were almost of one mind. It was pretty incredible!

Honestly, there is something beyond embarrassing about posting an interview 3 months after it was held, it’s almost shameful. However, this was such an enjoyable conversation and genuinely insightful that I think it’s worth the humiliation of admitting how slow I was to get it up.

Here, finally, is a transcription of our chat! Thanks so much to both of them for allowing me a peek into their world!

On the Order of Events – or how The Woods Beneath came to be

Rebekah: Leeds Town Hall got in touch at the beginning of the year, saying that they had this space and had heard good things about Lord Whitney and would we like to do something for Christmas.

They liked the idea of a winters forest and we went away and realised that we didn’t want to do this is a normal way – we wanted to do something quite different. And we wanted to do something that adults could get something from as well, not just for children and families.

It was a while before they were in touch and in the meantime we went down to London and watched some immersive theatre by a company called Punch Drunk, who are just THE BEST at what they do, EVER. We were massively inspired by that; the detail in their set and basically the idea that the further you explore the richer your experience is and we just thought that we had to try and bring something like that to Leeds.

We wanted to do something like that with actors for a really long time as well so it all felt like it started coming together at the same time. It felt like this was the time that we could do create something really special and really different.

twb logo

This is wonderful but it isn’t really a traditional Winters Wonderland…

R: No not at all. The Town Hall have been amazing. They’ve really championed our ideas and really tried to push us and they trust us. They believed in our vision. And it totally developed over time, especially once we got a writer involved and once Alexander, our Director became involved.

We wanted to create this world that was not necessarily Christmassy, but that was reminiscent of that festive period and of Winter. We had done an Arts Council funding project at the start of the year, all around folklore in Yorkshire which was called Lore of the North and through doing that we discovered so many amazing tales that were based in Yorkshire. They were so incredible and the narrative and backdrop to them were fascinating and we thought that if there was a way that we could tap into that, that we could develop from that, that we could combine it all; we would get so much depth in this project.

That’s something that fascinated me about this time of the year; the further back you go, it was Christmas then Pagan when it was the winter solstice, there is something almost tribal, something primal…

Alexander: There’s something ritualistic.

R: It’s our heritage. And that’s where all of this comes from. It’s been interesting to highlight all of that.

twb cs lewis

When putting it all together; the placement of the stars, the ogham alphabet, aspects of west European folklore – were these things that you knew about before or did you learn of these from your research?

R: A bit of both actually. Some aspects were brought to our attention earlier in the year during Lore of the North. We met an incredible scholar Stephen Sayers who used to work for the university and he was just amazing. He brought this whole new angle to folklore that we hadn’t really considered for that project. It was all about the importance of folklore and why it still so important to us today and how it can enrich our lives and provide us with an escape and escapism and just basically how as a society we need it still.

So we were really keen to get him involved  in this project as well. He pointed us in the direction of certain philosophers – Joseph Campbell and the hero’s journey from an ordinary world into an extraordinary world. We used that as a model, as a kind of starting point for our narrative and script for the piece.

So most of the bits that we used, that we learned about – it kind of snowballed really. Folklore, speaking to Stephen, reading up and different people that we’ve invited into the project have all brought different knowledge making it really a rich project.

The narrative and storyline felt very organic to the set that you created. But if you hadn’t told the story of Will of the Wisp, of Jack – there were many other stories that could have been told. I walked straight out thinking that this has to run all year round.

(At this point, it’s worth noting that Alexander – who has been deeply invested in the project on a full-time basis and clearly has been forgoing sleep to get all the details spot on – paled a touch!)

R: Ah, it’s so funny that you should say that. Because, we actually had to curb everything by quite a bit. We felt that it was getting so massive and the will of the wisp seemed to fit so nicely. We decided to focus on that. The idea of this character that’s forever trapped in this limbo land with his lantern, his torch that will bring him to the edge of the forest. And he’s trying to guide people…or is he? Perhaps he’s not trying to guide them, perhaps he’s trying to entice them to that place. And we felt that by having all that research up on the wall – we really wanted to encourage people to look.

The more that they look, the more they are making their own decisions about how the story will progress. So it’s up to you to decide who are these characters, why are they here – there are so many answers too on that wall as to why they could be there.

There appeared to be about 5 core subjects that people seemed to pick up on. But of course you didn’t have to provide them, it could have just been a space. How hard was it to settle on those stories? How important was it to have a coherent thread?

A: To be honest, I was less interested in narratives per se, it was more about the experiences. And I think that it’s really exciting that from the same show, two friends can come out and think that this show is about two different things. I’m all for the audience filling in the gaps and having the opportunity to do just that.

R: It’s exciting to not spoon feed people so much with it, to allow them to come up with their own theories and explanations.

A: And to make it more difficult for audience members – obviously this is not a sat down piece of theatre in an auditorium. We’re not giving them a story, we’re seeking to awaken their senses – they are not relaxed – they are active and they are searching for these bits of text. They are not being given a narrative.

For some audiences that’s very frustrating and very out of the ordinary, for others that’s very rejuvenating.

twb 02

However, this still has a component where it is about Christmas and it is targeted towards children also, who see in ways that are very different to adults but also perhaps require a somewhat more highlighted road map?

R: That one is more focused, though it’s along the same idea that we’re asking the adult audiences. We’re asking why these woods are starting to appear beneath the town hall. And that’s the same thing that we are asking the children. They are still met by Jack, but Jack is a different character. He’s a lot more excited to be showing the children the space. He’s not as mysterious or mischievous character in that sense. He’s more of a guardian of the woods. Someone who wants to be showing these families this space but again he equips them with questions and challenges to go further. Why do you think that woods would start growing here again? And it’s amazing the responses that children give back to it.

Maybe its nature trying to tell us to slow down. And they are responding with these really big issues and themes. Particularly environmental images, these are tiny children and they focus on so many different themes. It’s amazing the capacity that they have.

We do workshops with schools during the week before we open in the evening and it’s the same themes. We discuss the Holly King and the Oak King and the winter Solstice and the summer solstice and they fight. And perhaps that’s why the Holly King is trying to take over – that we’ve all forgotten the real meaning of Christmas. It’s incredible, it’s profound.

Presumably, you’ve heard all sorts of different explanations – what are a few of the more random ones?

R: A lot of people think that Gwen is a figment of Jack’s imagination. And in fact, so are the woods. That comes up quite a bit.

A: Yeah, that it’s not real. Which is interesting because of all the elements – you’re actually walking through the Woods. It’s been interesting.

R: A lot of people think that they are lovers. Or father and daughter. That she’s dead.

A: That comes up quite a bit. That’s she actually dead. In both sessions actually. Or that he is. Or that he is searching for her.

Interesting that the children are coming back with so many environmental themes. My age group are quite consumerist in outlook – we don’t care how our iPhones are made, just that they work. So it’s interesting that the younger crowd are more focused on the impact that we are having on the city and the country…

R: We really wanted the Father Christmas experience to be very inclusive and to  – this is tricky to phrase right – we didn’t want it to be so much about the Christian festival or about the Santa Claus story and the consumerism. We wanted it to be about this gift giver that seen in a lot of different traditions. All across the world, there is this character that brings joy at this time of year and has a message that needs to be passed on. That’s one of the reasons that we toyed with called it Father Winter …having said that we needed to take it one step at a time…

A: He’s a story-teller as well. Stories used to be considered gifts.

R: He thanks the children for their gift – which is time and we thought that was a lovely way of doing that – one that isn’t orientated in consumerism. This is the first year that we’ve done something like this. We had to push boundaries and test the water.

We didn’t really know how it was going to go, so even just for ourselves we were setting boundaries and testing them. We still obviously want to bring across the magic of this time of year – we didn’t want to be about all these passive political ideas or anything.

That’s something about being set in Nature – it reminds us that whether it’s snow falling or leaves falling – every time of year can be a magical time of year if you take the time to appreciate it…

A: Actually, this green message that was seemingly being picked up on by Father Christmas – this also comes out in the evening show, especially when the stars are moving. The time period that it’s all set in as well.

It feels like it’s set in a period up to Sputnik and from then on, we sort of stalled. Our technology moved on but we stopped looking upwards and outwards…

R: That’s actually one of the reasons that we ask people to turn off their phones. We want people to have intimate experiences in the space and feel fully immersed. Jack asks for the time and it’s funny that so few people have watches. These things are really important. People are losing touch of real life experiences and that’s really important to all of us that were working on this. We are really keen to give people that experience. So not taking pictures and putting them on instagram – not that we didn’t want the images to be shared but that we wanted people to actually be there and to

A: to actually be part of the world and to know that they weren’t in an ordinary place still or that they only see everything through a screen.

R: We haven’t had anyone come out and say that it was frustrating not to have been able to use their phone. If anything they have come out and felt that…not that the world is boring but to maybe view it without the screen…

twb town hall 02

Obviously, I’m a reader and when I came out – we talked about Narnia. That and Tolkien, middle earth and all those places that make us reflect on the natural world came to mind

R: Yes, all these places – Narnia, Lord of the Rings and Tolkien, Wonderland and Oz – these all had a massive influence on us all as children. All these worlds that you can escape to. And even Enid Blyton and the magic far-away tree and to create a space where adults felt like they could do that in the middle of the city. I’m really proud to think that we’ve achieved that.

A: A lot of people are coming out and saying that they’ve reclaimed their childhood excitement. That they’re seeing the world in that way again. That there is a thrill again.

R: And that’s exactly what Stephen Sayers was saying at the beginning of the year. That this thrill, this feeling of being a child again, that if you can find that feeling as an adult, it’s the most special thing ever. To not lose sight of us as so many adults do. Which is such a shame.

Do you think that this will not perhaps change the direction that you are moving in but that it will inform it?

R: Yes, I think so definitely. I think we can say that this is probably the most proud that we have been of any of our projects. The level of talent that we’ve seen in the team, the work that we’ve all put in from the writers to the set builders to the direction and the performance – everyone has been just put there. And we’ve all been on the same page, it’s been an absolute pleasure working with people. We’ve all had the same thing that’s driving us and we’ve all wanted to be part of and create this wondrous and magical thing. So yes, definitely.

Is there any prospect that this could become something longer? A bit more permanent?

R: Well, there isn’t anything properly. There has been some talk.

Presumably all the research that you’ve done has been for this time of year, but there is clearly a potentially season element…

A: Absolutely.

R: We have actually found ourselves wondering what the Woods would look like during another season. What would they be like in Spring? What would they be like in Summer? What would they be like in Autumn?

Who would the guides be?

R: We like the idea that if the Woods did come round again they would look and feel and *be* totally different… and there would be different people to meet and different doors to open… You wouldn’t ever see the same thing twice.

A: There are a lot of different ideas. A lot of different ways that audiences could move. I’m interested in how audiences could be part of a big spectacle but still get an intimate and increasingly personal experience. Just having more of that. Having more of that sense.

We only have two actors in this show. And what they are doing between the pair of them … it’s amazing. To give every audience member the breath of experience. And to give that to each audience. It’s incredibly focused. They have so much to do and convey and it’s very demanding for them. They are doing such a fantastic job.

But if it were to evolve. If it were to change, there could be more performers. More experiences and more of a sense of community within the audience from when they arrive.

R: We’re so passionate about the North and we’re so passionate about bringing these experience to people up here so we kind of had to test the water a little bit with this. We felt that this time round it needed to be focused but sure, we have some very big ideas. If there’s a next time next year they can be realised.

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The set design is incredible but with you saying that I’m already trying to imagine how it could look and sound and evolve. 

On that note, let’s talk about the importance of the music and the sound which adds so much to setting the atmosphere of the production…

A: Oh the music is such a huge part of it.

R: It’s had such an impact.

A: And there’s a huge potential for it to become more interactive.

R: We did consider having live music and dance and more elements of performance. More of the senses being engaged. Smell was really important to us this time round. That’s something we’d like to build on for next year. We have this mist that we use in the wooden cabin… We want it to appeal to all the senses as you walk in. Doing it was something that we knew we could build on.

The music was done by Buffalo Spaces and they were incredible. Lins (Wilson) – our producer – this is one of her projects with John Folger and they are just incredible. They’ve created this incredible sound piece for us and they do installations and again – how we researched the folklore and the forest and the history – they did the exact same thing with the sounds and music.

They only wanted to use songs from a certain era and sounds that reflected the winter season and yet also festive. Then also songs about being lost and to do with the stars . Even when you do recognise the song – it was never a predictable choice. It’s totally just informed the full thing.

When we hear any of the songs now, it just transports us straight back. That’s how successful they’ve been at curating this – it’s just been so amazing.

Leeds has a huge underground that’s not currently open to the public, it’s not being explored – I’m thinking now of the Library next door and the Art Gallery…

R: We know of some tunnels…honestly our ideas…at Lord Whitney, we’re not short of ideas, if anything we need reining in a little bit sometimes, so already we’re thinking  and we’ve had some discussion about next year. About this project, about other projects. Leeds is an incredible city. It’s got amazing spaces…a lot of empty spaces, unused. Which could all be opened up for some incredible performances and immersive environments. Next year, we’d love to do something. Maybe bigger.

[Alexander pales again, then gets this weird look when it seems he’s actually visualising a bigger version and what that could be]

This was my first immersive experience. I didn’t know what to expect. Is this possibly the largest immersive theatre experience that’s happened in Leeds?

A: In Leeds, yes. There was You, at the Playhouse, but I believe this is larger.

R: This is probably the biggest. We were cautious about advertising this as ‘immersive’ because we didn’t want anyone to feel excluded. Or feel like ‘I don’t do theatre’. It took us a while to find our wording for the project.

Hopefully now that its run, next year we’ll be able to build upon this. People will be more familiar and know what to expect. We have had people come in and wonder what they’re supposed to do. And we’ve had people who have never seen anything like it, have never known that there was anything like this who have come out of it going ‘I need to go again NOW’. And we fully sold out which was just incredible. We never actually thought that this would happen.

There has been a lot of word of mouth…

A: That seems to be how something like this works best.

R: If you have a friend who says that you just have to go, then you’ll think about attending it more than if you see an advert. You trust them, you know you like the same things ‘I’m just going to do it!’

And – not to be vulgar – but this is affordable theatre…

R: Totally! We didn’t want to be exclusive in any way with this project. That was the whole reason we didn’t want it to feel too Chrismassy, we wanted for anyone to feel like they could come and enjoy it. That’s why it was more to do with the seasons and our shared folklore

A: You’re actually getting incredible value for money. If you’re thinking economically, it’s incredible what an audience gets at this experience compared to those in London. If you’re thinking pound to minute of the performance, you get so much out of this.

And – aside from attracting the young – this is a project that can appeal to people who might not normally consider going to the theatre 

R: Totally! And that’s before you consider that there’s this gorgeous little pop up pub here also!

It might not be for everyone but hopefully there have been people who have come and had an experience they never ever imagined.

Certainly on twitter – people have sent really good feedback – even a few who have said that ‘this has changed my life!’ which is just like WOW – it’s amazing, it’s more than we could ever have imagined! To have had just *one* of those comments would have made the project for me.

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If there a weirdness to that? Getting a message like that and thinking ‘I wrote this’ or ‘I created that, I put that in place’…

R: Honestly, we’re all just so sleep deprived! Maybe by February we’ll be able to sort of take it all on board!!

A: For me, it was amazing. I brought some people up who are avid fans of Punch Drunk and they go and see all of those shows and can go back and see it many many times and who are used to spending maybe £50 a pop on a ticket (R: They are at the top of their game of this world) and they came up to see this. They booked hotels, they booked trains. And then they gave this rave reviews. And for them to do that… For me, it’s more impressive that we are bringing in Joe Public and hearing really positive things, but to ALSO get top end people, who frequent these type of shows – for them to admire the depth and detail that we’ve achieved. That makes me really proud.

Online, there have been a few people scratching their heads, but the reviews seem to have been very positive

R: We’ve heard a lot of that! People saying that they had to go back and do it again because they weren’t sure what to make or it! We never thought that we’d get it right straight away. We just hoped that we’d create something that people could relate to and want more of! And a lot of people have really responded to it so well. It’s been…just terrific.

So what’s next for the pair of you?

R: Sleep.

A: Definitely sleep.

R:  We’ve just done our dining experience which is our Feast of Fools, where we had 30 guests a night come and drink and dance and generally be a bit… A: Mischievous! R: Exactly! And that was brilliant. We used more actors, space and had a similar sort of experience to the evenings. It was great fun. So we’re sort of recovering from that now. We’re starting to get the team together to get everything packed up and move out. But we feel like we can’t quite leave!

A: I’ve been meeting with the actors once a week, to give them some new ideas, to discuss the quality of the performance, introduce new lines and things like that.

R: If people do come back again, they won’t be having the same experience. It’s been changing and evolving.

A: This is a totally different show to when it first opened. Totally. We wanted to see if someone came in the first week and then came back in the last week – we wanted to know that they would see a totally different show.

I TRIED! But you went and sold out. Very annoying

[Both hung their heads, then laughed at me. I don’t think they minded one little bit actually]

A: Sorry! It’s terrible really.

[He wasn’t sorry at all I tell you!]

R: It has been weird trying to think of what this will be like when it’s all over. I don’t actually know how I’ll react once it’s all done. What will I do with myself!

the wood beneath

Has this, or how has this – the philosophy and reconnecting with folklore – changed your perspective? I’m actively reducing my time online for example…

R: I was just going to say, that’s been one of the biggest things. This project has really made me reflect on the importance of switching off, or turning the phone around and having some time away from it all. I think it’s awakened – I mean we at Lord Whitney, it’s always been something that’s close to our heart – but that idea that feeling of being playful. This has reminded me of how important this is and how much I love that feeling. And if I can keep on trying to make other people see that for the rest of my life, I think I could die a happy woman! If I could show people that you don’t have to grow up, you can still play, you can still feel that joy…

For me, with the book clubs, there are quite a few now and I’m focused on getting back to the stories – books have always make me feel that way – and worrying less about the admin-y side of things

R: I know exactly what you mean. We (myself and Amy) work at lot in fashion and editorials. We can spend all days ordering things and writing emails. And it sort of sucks you dry and this project has made us both be out there. We are dressing sets and researching and doing the things that we love. This has made us so excited. This was a tough project and it’s grown so much and it’s been stressful at times but it’s been so worth it and exciting. If I could just carry on doing things like this, I’d be the happiest woman ever!

A: From a purely directorial point of view, it’s taught me a lot about exploring the possibilities of these one-to-one experiences and exactly how can you give someone a really, genuinely personal, not manufactured experience. So, I’ve done stuff in the past where it’s all a one-on-one, so you go from scene to scene with different actors but you know that this is kind of the formula of the performance. You know that in the next scene you will see a performer act and you know what’s going to happen. (R: I HATE that. I love it when you don’t know what to expect!).

Personally, I’m a lot more green aware and I feel like I wasn’t so aware of the impact that we have. I’ve become aware of Carl Sagan through our research. His philosophies which I’m become aware of due to this has had an impact. I’m quoting him to my friend which is just seriously uncool … but I love how – with a project like this – when it touches you in a deeper way.

R: I actually studied some philosophy as an A level and I love it. But I was torn between a creative career at uni – I would have loved to study philosophy at university but that wasn’t my path. I think all of us involved in this – we’ve all been touched by this. It”s been a pleasure to look at things like Campbell again. I never thought that it would have come full circle like this.

Well, it is actually quite a strange thing that here you choose at 16 really what you are going to do. To be a creative, or go down an academic route, or I guess a creative academic route. A project like this challenges you whether you regard yourself as academic, scientific or creative. It brings us all together in a strange sort of way and reminds us that we are none of us just that one thing

R: Yes. Definitely. I completely agree with you. When you do such a creative thing as a job, you get absorbed.

A: It’s possible to be creative and pointless…self indulgent. This just…wasn’t that!

R: The folklore project was like doing a dissertation again. It brought you back to what actually mattered. It was fascinating – the more I researched the more it opened doors. Of course, we then had to rein ourselves back in.

It’s almost upsetting that I had to experience this. If it was on a dvd, I could watch it every time I feel depleted…but that’s not really how something like this works…

A: It’s not quite the point of something like this. The point is maybe to go out and experience again to get back that feeling

R: That’s what is so special about these kind of things. That no photo or film will ever do it justice. It’s how you felt while you were there. That’s the important thing. That’s the importance of going to these things. And actually of real life. That you LIVE it, not live it through a screen or via an image or a recording…

We’ve already been wondering how the hell do we reflect this on our website. I mean, really. Really. What do you say? How?

A: How would you film it? There are infinite ways of capturing or seeing this. There are so many facets.

R: We’ve dreamed up this whole world and I’ve only seen about a fifth of it? I don’t even know what the actors do sometimes. I hear things and I’m like really? Where was that? I haven’t seen that!! I’m almost a little bit gutted that it sold out, I’d love for people to experience it again. We even considered making the group sizes bigger – maybe 30 people but in the end we decided to focus on that personal experience. That was our emphasis. That was our direction.

It’s having Jack look you in the eyes. Having Gwen take you to a room. Finding the nuts in the cabin.

We had this one guy the first week that just sat in the cabin, eating nuts. We were like – go for it! You experience this as you want to! Another was in the middle of the woods, just listening to the music.

I’m love to have left a bottle of wine for them.

Maybe the last night…?

R: Yeah, maybe

A: Maybe. Maybe. Maybe not. Let’s talk about that one!!

Check out the trailer for the Wood beneath the World on Youtube below!

Twitter: @LordWhitney

Twitter: @AlexanderPalmer

Visit the official The Woods Beneath the World website HERE

Facebook: facebook.com/thewoodbeneath

Twitter: @thewoodbeneath

Instagram: @thewoodbeneath

REVEIW – Boi Boi is Dead at the West Yorkshire Playhouse

Afro-jazz legend, father, lover, playboy, husband, rulebreaker, enigmatic force of nature… Boi Boi is dead. But not forgotten.

Left alone to rebuild her life, Miriam’s heartache is interrupted when Boi Boi’s reckless ex-wife Stella and traditionalistic brother show up to stake their claim on his name, on his property and to revel in the glory of his fame. Determined to keep her family together, Miriam’s life is thrown into turmoil when Stella discovers the secret she shared only with Boi Boi. Will the beguiling Stella be triumphant in the face of Boi Boi’s death? Live music entwines with crackling dialogue in this sharp new production for the Courtyard stage.

boi boi is dead

Zodwa Nyoni, a poet and playwright, has released her first full length play. It covers the course of a family at its most introspective and potentially destructive. Biting dialogue, a playful use of music and superb visuals – this production contains and highlights all the elements that the West Yorkshire Playhouse excels at.

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Photographer Richard Davenport

The titular Boi Boi – as you may or may not expect given the context – was an almost permanent presence on the stage. Jack Benjamin portrays the character as ever watchful; at times subtle, jubilant, guilty or sad…but most impressively, Boi Boi is constantly a pale shadow or reflection of the man that he used to be. Veteran actor Andrew French is particualy impressive as Ezra. In the opening moments, it is difficult to imagine every warming to this dismissive, traditional and sexist character; yet by the halfway mark, Ezra had demonstrated (a degree of )warmth and a fear of letting his family down that was very humanising. While the character never becomes likeable, neither was he the villain of the piece. Joseph Adelakun plays the petulant Petu with verve, while Debbie Korley makes the teenage Una relatable and easily the most pleasant character of the ensemble.

The stand outs of the production though are the two women whose lives were dominated by Boi Boi’s life. Lynette Clarke alternatively intrigues and repulses as the manipulative and evocative Stella. Her presence is universally undesired. Her intentions are transparent and ego driven. Her behaviour is brash…but as Boi Bois widow – estranged or not – her rights cannot be ignored. Her character is a total contrast to the put upon, maternal and warm hearted Miriam, who is masterfully brought to life by Angela Wynter. Miriam, who has held the household together for 12 years, has no valid claim to her home. She has provided for and loved Boi Boi and Una and loathes the carefree and careless Stella. Their interactions are powerful and provide the heart of this production.

One of the strengths is that it deliberately eschews moralistic overtones. As is the case in life, behaving well or selflessly doesn’t bring guarantees or rewards; any more then behaving outlandishly or inconsiderately brings with it trials or tribulations. Had there be even a hint of a political aspect to this production, I would have been disappointed at the suggestion that the only hope for young Zimbabweans was that they move to another country (in this case England), but there wasn’t. This was a deeply personal and family orientated story – no external influences were mentioned and the decisions made by the characters were based only on personal and family lines. Only one action within the play didn’t quite ring true to me. Throughout, only one relationship seems to be healthy and strong – that of Miriam and Una, which made Una’s actions during the conclusion to be unusually callous.

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Photographer Richard Davenport

 

Music also played a distinctive and mood setting role. Live music, singing and chanting – all are interspersed with the plot and dialogue in ways that feel organic and alternatively unobtrusive or attention grabbing. An afro jazz song was used to particular effect during a scene where Miriam recalled meeting and flirting with Boi Boi. Perhaps the only misfire in my view, was Una’s song. While the lyrics were no doubt very poignant, the song itself was very ambitiously structured which made it difficult to follow them.

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Photographer Richard Davenport

The ending is rather marvellously ambiguous and how it concludes very much dependson your viewpoint. For me, I think that societal and community consideration will take priority. The only people who can understand the attempt and the need to move on from Boi Boi and the disastrous impact he had are those others who were similarly impacted by him.  There is an intangible link between them. Despite what the characters may have said earlier in the production, family does not always require a blood connection.

The backdrop was very beautiful and provided a setting that was lovely to look at but I felt underutilised. While certain set pieces – such as the dog with the bone at the very beginning were very evocative; they didn’t seem to provide any function beyond being visually satisfying, which would have made sense had this been a purely minimalist play. However, boxes were moved forward and back, without ever seeming to be essential to the production. At one point, a character brings out a basin and returns it after half a minute – it felt like a somewhat unnecessary back and forth. On the other hand, the use of empty space on the stage was interesting. Characters operated as silhouettes; moved in strange and often isolated patters in the background. The space was obviously emblematic of the gap left in each characters life after the death of Boi Boi – an effective visual.

From the ages of 9 to 16, I lived in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, so I was extremely excited to learn that Boi Boi is Dead would be performed at the West Yorkshire Playhouse. However, this play was one that transcends its setting. Sure, the music and certain phrases and mindsets felt very orientated in Southern Africa – but the tale itself is that of a dysfunctional family. This family – torn apart and recreating itself after a death and deception – could have been set anywhere, because people in pain exist everywhere. Like the best storytellers, Zodwa Nyoni has woven a truth in a particular context, one that she happens to be familiar with, but it is one that rings true domestically, throughout the world.

Boi Boi is Dead runs until the 7th of March

Writer –  Zodwa Nyoni
Director  – Lucian Msamati
Designer – Francisco Rodriguez-Weil
Dramaturg – Alex Chisholm (Interview with LeedsBookClub HERE and HERE)

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Boi Boi is Dead at the West Yorkshire Playhouse

Buy tickets HERE

 

Theatre Reviews

CANCELLATION – Jacqueline Harvey at the Leeds Church Institute

PLEASE NOTE – THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED

An Afternoon with Children’s Author

Jacqueline Harvey 

and the Heroine of Her Books, Alice-Miranda!

big book endWHEN: Saturday the 24th of January 2015

WHERE: Leeds Church Institute, Central Road, Leeds

(Opposite the Corn Exchange, just off Vicar Lane, above the Out of This World shop.)

TIME: 2pm – 4pm

COST: Free Event (with refreshments available for only £1 contribution)

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Come and meet Australian children’s author

and learn about her amazing books!

 

 

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