Category Archives: LBC 3 Reads

LBC 3 Reads – Book 15 – All Quiet on the Western Front

#LBC3Reads

Date:  16th of April 2016
Time:  11am – 1pm
Address: Unit 2
Munro House,
Duke St,
Leeds LS9 8AG

DISCUSSED – 

ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT 
ERICH MARIA REMARQUE

BLURB

One by one the boys begin to fall…

In 1914 a room full of German schoolboys, fresh-faced and idealistic, are goaded by their schoolmaster to troop off to the ‘glorious war’. With the fire and patriotism of youth they sign up. What follows is the moving story of a young ‘unknown soldier’ experiencing the horror and disillusionment of life in the trenches.

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR (AMAZON)

Erich Maria Remarque was a German author and veteran of the First World War. He was born 1898 in Osnabrück, Germany. At the age of 18 he was conscripted into the German army. During his service he was wounded by shrapnel in the left leg, right arm and neck. Following the war he worked as a primary school teacher, and later as a librarian, a journalist and a technical writer.
Among Remarque’s published novels were All Quiet on the Western Front, The Road Back, Three Comrades and Arch of Triumph. His works were publicly burned by the Nazi German government, and in 1947 he and his first wife became naturalised citizens of the United States. Four years earlier, his sister had been executed at the behest of Hitler’s ‘People’s Court’.
Remarque adapted the book Ten Days to Die, about Hitler’s final days, as a screenplay, and he also wrote for the stage. His last novel was The Night in Lisbon, published in 1962. During his lifetime Remarque married twice and had love affairs with the actresses Hedy Lamarr, Marlene Dietrich and Greta Garbo.

 

Thanks very much to the wonderful Karoline for hosting and writing up this book club – find her here @KarolineAKemp!

It was good to welcome two new faces to our discussion, Jane and Katy who also come to White Swan.

We had a discussion about the translation, some of the group had a more recent translation from the mid 1990’s and it was generally felt to be much more accessible than the earlier one.  We also discussed the translation of the title, the note on the new translation states that a direct translation from the German is ‘Nothing New on the Western Front’

The book was fairly easy to read in the modern translation and it was noted that that the tense changed from the singular to the plural during the scenes at the front. It was noted that nowadays we expect to have strong characterisation and narrative drive from contemporary fiction but that there is no narrative drive in War.  As the book went on it became more and more detached as Paul became more detached from his own life.

AQOTWF is written from the point of view of a German private Paul. It was felt that the language used  was chosen to emphasise the commonality and gruelling of experience of trench warfare regardless of side. Emphasised particularly in the scene in the shell hole with the solider that he killed.  It is also something that has been brought out recently by historians of the First World War (see the History Hit podcast with @gerarmyresearch).

It was felt that the language used effectively conveyed vivid  imagery of the experiences of being in the front line as well as the banality of being behind the lines when comic interludes such as Kat getting the food were used to good effect. The emphasis on the food (or lack) of it conveyed its importance to the troops, most effectively that when they suddenly get good food they realise that it means they are heading to the front line.

We felt that the characterisation was kept deliberately vague, the concentration was on passages dealing with Paul’s interior life such as when he was on leave and felt totally alienated from his previous life, We felt that Paul represented the everyman, he grew but never lost his humanity.

We felt that the strong bond between the school friends was shown well.  We all felt the horror of the scenes with the rats and felt that the scenes in the mists where very lyrical which intensified the horror.

The book also pointed out how much harder it was going to be for the younger men who had become soldiers straight from school to readjust and/or keep going as they didn’t have families/jobs to go back to.  It was also very scathing about the generation who were too old to fight themselves but where very vocal at making the younger generations go.

We decided that we  would have preferred the end to have been left more open than it was and felt that it packed a lot into quite a slim book.

 

Trailer for the 1979 film

[youtube https://youtu.be/DX1PW2n8POg]

 

SCORE –

8/10

Find fellow members on twitter by searching for #LBC3Reads.
Follow @Cafe164 for details on the deliciousables!
Let me know your thoughts by either tweeting me @LeedsBookClub, commenting below or emailing me at leedsbookclub@gmail.com

BOOK CLUB MEET UP PAGE

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August and September Book Choices!

We have our next few months choices in!

LBC 3 Reads (#LBC3Reads)

  • NOTE – moved to August – venue TBA
  • High Rising – Angela Thirkell

LBC Horsforth (#LBCHorsforth)

  • 9 August – The Good Immigrant – Nikesh Shukla
  • 13 September – The Lemon Table – Julian Barnes

LBC White Swan (#LBCWSwan)

  • 13 August – The last condo board of the Apocalypse – Nina Post
  • 10 September – Pirate Cinema – Cory Doctorow

February and March Choices

Hi all,

As I’ve been a bit out of things, I’m only just getting around to finding out what books are when. Please do let me know if I get the books in the wrong order, the dates muddled and so on!

Shall be aiming to catch up with emails and admin over the next fortnight – apologies if you’ve been waiting ages!!

February

  • 8th – Horsforth – The Tale of the Duelling Neurosurgeons – Sam Kean
  • 12th – White Swan – The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet – Becky Chambers

March

  • 8th – Horsforth – God help the child – Toni Morrison
  • 12th – White Swan – TBA

April

  • 12th – Horsforth – TBA
  • 9th – White Swan – TBA
  • 22nd – LBC3 Reads – Whit by Iain Banks

happy-reading

LBC 3 Reads – Date Change!

#LBC3Reads
Date:  *14th of November 2015*
Time:  11am – 1pm
Address: Unit 2
Munro House,
Duke St,
Leeds LS9 8AG

 

Our Choice

THE TIN DRUM

GUNTER GRASS

lbc 3 02

BLURB

On his third birthday Oskar decides to stop growing. Haunted by the deaths of his parents and wielding his tin drum Oskar recounts the events of his extraordinary life; from the long nightmare of the Nazi era to his anarchic adventures is post-war Germany

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Günter Grass, born in Danzig in 1927, is Germany’s most celebrated contemporary writer. He is a creative artist of remarkable versatility: novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, graphic artist. Grass was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1999.

Breon Mitchell’s translations include works by Franz Kafka, Heinrich Boll, and many others. He is the recipient of several awards for literary translation, he is Professor of Germanic Literature at Indiana University, and Director of the Lilly Library.

LBC 3 Reads – Book 12 – I know why the caged bird sings

#LBC3Reads
Date:  15th of August 2015
Time:  11am – 1pm
Address: Unit 2
Munro House,
Duke St,
Leeds LS9 8AG

DISCUSSED – 

I KNOW WHY THE CAGED BIRD SINGS
MAYA ANGELOU

BLURB

A classic coming-of-age story

In this, the celebrated, bestselling first volume of her autobiography, Maya Angelou beautifully evokes her childhood with her grandmother in the American South of the 1930s.

She learns the power of the white folks at the other end of town and suffers the terrible trauma of rape by her mother’s lover. As a black woman, Maya Angelou has known discrimination and extreme poverty, but also hope and joy, celebration and achievement; loving the world, she also knows its cruelty.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR (AMAZON)

Dr Maya Angelou was one of the world’s most important writers and activists. Born 4 April 1928, she lived and chronicled an extraordinary life: rising from poverty, violence and racism, she became a renowned author, poet, playwright, civil rights’ activist – working with Malcolm X and Martin Luther King – and memoirist. She wrote and performed a poem, ‘On the Pulse of Morning’, for President Clinton on his inauguration; she was given the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Obama and was honoured by more than seventy universities throughout the world.

She first thrilled the world with I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (1969). This was followed by six volumes of autobiography, the seventh and final volume, Mom & Me & Mom, published in 2013. She wrote three collections of essays; many volumes of poetry, including His Day is Done, a tribute to Nelson Mandela; and two cookbooks. She had a lifetime appointment as Reynolds Professor of American Studies at Wake Forest University of North Carolina. Dr Angelou died on 28 May 2014.

i know whyWe decided to read this in honour of Maya Angelou’s life, after she passed away. Despite being a relatively short book; we found quite a few different aspects to discuss, far too many to include here – I’ll try to make sure that I get the highlights here!

For many of us, this was a re-read. We agreed that this is a book best discovered during your adolescence. While it remains a tremendously crafted book; it didn’t quite have the same impact on us as adults. This is one of those rare works which allows articulation of some of the really negative aspects of growing up.

We all felt that it was powerfully written, even as some of us found certain topics and chapters deeply upsetting. The matter of My’s rape for example was repeatedly referred too; obviously because it had such a profound impact on the characters within the story. The responses to it read so realistically – it provoked an equally powerful response.

We found My to be a fascinating character. She is passionate, determined, focused and angry. She notes herself that her anger was seen as disproportionate by others within her community but she used it effectively to motivate herself despite adversity.

In the main we agreed that this was not a challenging read, language wise. Only one of us found it tough to get through; though they suspected that they are just not natural biography readers. For a few minutes we chatted about other authors such as Enid Blyton; Carolyn Keene and L.J. Smith.

We found it interesting that this is a fictionalised history, even more so as a few of us had read or were reading A Tree Grows in Brooklyn for another book club. That book is structurally very similar to this one. Both are coming of age stories, both demonstrate the effects of poverty, deprivation, sexism and racism. Both protagonists are let down by their fathers and come from families with determined women. Both find solace and hope through education and literature.

However, they cover different time frames and cultures. Perhaps the most important similarity is that both read as though they could be ‘true’; that these are real histories recorded by Betty Smith and Maya Angelou and attributed to one character rather than many.

The central themes of identity and racism seemed to hold particular relevance to the current conversations that are taking place across the globe and especially in the US. Naturally we had to chat about current affairs for a little while.

We discussed Mary and the taking away of her name as a method of dehumanising people. The relationship throughout this are well drawn, though we were particularly taken with that of the siblings. Their reactions to one another, their bond and their grief to being abandoned by both parents felt very realistic. Painfully so actually. I felt that there was an absence of female friendship, though others either didn’t agree or hadn’t noticed it. We did agree that this is a family story; which is probably why the emphasis is on family members rather than friendships.

This was also a notable book club because it marks the first LBC 3 Reads where we DIDN’T mention Benedict Cumberbatch; seemingly swapping our allegiance to Tom Hiddleston. I imagine the former will be gutted and that latter delighted to know it.

Oh and by pure coincidence, Cafe 164 had on a spotify playlist on that provided the perfect soundtrack to our conversation; coffee and cake. Lauryn Hill, Aaliyah, Nina Simone and Dusty Springfield (I think!).

🙂

Trailer for the 1979 film, co-written by Maya Angelou

[youtube https://youtu.be/jNvdhi75HqM]

SCORE –

7.5/10

Find fellow members on twitter by searching for #LBC3Reads.
Follow @Cafe164 for details on the deliciousables!
 
Let me know your thoughts by either tweeting me @LeedsBookClub, commenting below or emailing me at leedsbookclub@gmail.com


BOOK CLUB MEET UP PAGE

LBC 3 Reads – Date Change!

#LBC3Reads
Date:  *14th of November 2015*
Time:  11am – 1pm
Address: Unit 2
Munro House,
Duke St,
Leeds LS9 8AG

 

Our Choice

THE TIN DRUM

GUNTER GRASS

lbc 3 02

BLURB

On his third birthday Oskar decides to stop growing. Haunted by the deaths of his parents and wielding his tin drum Oskar recounts the events of his extraordinary life; from the long nightmare of the Nazi era to his anarchic adventures is post-war Germany

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Günter Grass, born in Danzig in 1927, is Germany’s most celebrated contemporary writer. He is a creative artist of remarkable versatility: novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, graphic artist. Grass was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1999.

Breon Mitchell’s translations include works by Franz Kafka, Heinrich Boll, and many others. He is the recipient of several awards for literary translation, he is Professor of Germanic Literature at Indiana University, and Director of the Lilly Library.

 

LBC 3 Reads – Date Change – PLEASE NOTE

#LBC3Reads
Date:  *22nd of August 2015*
Time:  11am – 1pm
Address: Unit 2
Munro House,
Duke St,
Leeds LS9 8AG

 

Our Choice

I KNOW WHY THE CAGED BIRD SINGS

MAYA ANGELOU

lbc 3 01BLURB (from Amazon)

Maya Angelou’s seven volumes of autobiography are a testament to the talents and resilience of this extraordinary writer. Loving the world, she also knows its cruelty. As a Black woman she has known discrimination and extreme poverty, but also hope, joy, achievement and celebration. In this first volume of her six books of autobiography, Maya Angelou beautifully evokes her childhood with her grandmother in the American south of the 1930s. She learns the power of the white folks at the other end of town and suffers the terrible trauma of rape by her mother’s lover.

‘I write about being a Black American woman, however, I am always talking about what it’s like to be a human being. This is how we are, what makes us laugh, and this is how we fall and how we somehow, amazingly, stand up again’ Maya Angelou

ABOUT THE AUTHOR (from Amazon)

Dr Maya Angelou was one of the world’s most important writers and activists. Born 4 April 1928, she lived and chronicled an extraordinary life: rising from poverty, violence and racism, she became a renowned author, poet, playwright, civil rights’ activist – working with Malcolm X and Martin Luther King – and memoirist. She wrote and performed a poem, ‘On the Pulse of Morning’, for President Clinton on his inauguration; she was given the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Obama and was honoured by more than seventy universities throughout the world.

She first thrilled the world with I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (1969). This was followed by six volumes of autobiography, the seventh and final volume, Mom & Me & Mom, published in 2013. She wrote three collections of essays; many volumes of poetry, including His Day is Done, a tribute to Nelson Mandela; and two cookbooks. She had a lifetime appointment as Reynolds Professor of American Studies at Wake Forest University of North Carolina. Dr Angelou died on 28 May 2014.

Date:  *14th of November 2015*
Time:  11am – 1pm
Address: Unit 2
Munro House,
Duke St,
Leeds LS9 8AG

 

Our Choice

THE TIN DRUM

GUNTER GRASS

lbc 3 02

BLURB (from Amazon)

On his third birthday Oskar decides to stop growing. Haunted by the deaths of his parents and wielding his tin drum Oskar recounts the events of his extraordinary life; from the long nightmare of the Nazi era to his anarchic adventures is post-war Germany

ABOUT THE AUTHOR (from Amazon)

Günter Grass, born in Danzig in 1927, is Germany’s most celebrated contemporary writer. He is a creative artist of remarkable versatility: novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, graphic artist. Grass was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1999.

Breon Mitchell’s translations include works by Franz Kafka, Heinrich Boll, and many others. He is the recipient of several awards for literary translation, he is Professor of Germanic Literature at Indiana University, and Director of the Lilly Library.

 

LBC 3 Reads – Book 10 – The Return of the Soldier

#LBC3Reads
Date:  21st of February 2015 REA 16th of May 2015
Time:  11am – 1pm
Address: Unit 2
Munro House,
Duke St,
Leeds LS9 8AG

DISCUSSED – 

THE RETURN OF THE SOLDIER
REBECCA WEST

BLURB

The soldier returns from the front to the three women who love him. His wife, Kitty, with her cold, moonlight beauty and his devoted cousin Jenny wait in their exquisite home on the crest of the Harrow-weald. Margaret Allington, his first and long-forgotten love, is nearby in the dreary suburb of Wealdstone.

But the soldier is shell-shocked and can only remember the Margaret he loved fifteen years before, when he was a young man and she an inn-keeper’s daughter. His cousin he remembers only as a childhood playmate; his wife he remembers not at all.

The women have a choice – to leave him where he wishes to be, or to ‘cure’ him. It is Margaret who reveals a love so great that she can make the final sacrifice.

the return of the soldierIn the main, we were all very responsive to this book. For all but one, this was the first time that we had encountered this author and we were tremendously impressed with her use of language. Despite the somewhat heavy subject matter, this was a quick and easy read. We all of us felt that we were likely to pick it up again in the future.

Of the writing, the flow couldn’t have been better sustained. It was sharp and the observations – individual or social – crisp. However, I wouldn’t like to give the impression of utilitarianism – this little book contains beautiful descriptive passages that paint a picture, not only of the world around our protagonists; but also the time in which they lived.

It felt as though the characters – particularly Kitty – emerged from the pages fully formed. She was so protected, self absorbed and single minded. Her character should have horrified us – particularly when she desired that her husband return to the front lines – but she was too well drawn for that. Kitty was a bastion of the past who lived in a bubble, desperate clinging to tradition to try and stop the changes even she must have recognised as inevitable. Instead, we could only pity her…while being very relieved that Jenny and Margaret had a far better instinctive grasp of shell shock.

Jenny on the other hand was a mixed bag. Her aloof and removed observations were a transparent shield – in every line her emotional connection with the family was affirmed – as well as her apparent love for Chris. We see the war and the world through her eyes. Yet, she was a bystander; an observer of events rather than an active participant and I for one found her to be an unreliable narrator. However, she is also the only one actually paying attention to the consequences of Chris’ condition and later his feelings for Margaret.

Margaret and Chris are less defined. The story requires that the bulk of their time together is dominated by the past. Chris is trapped in it and Margaret wistful for the could-have-beens. Together, they represent all that is physical and emotional in Rebecca West’s created world. It is Margaret who realises that Chris is as impacted by one ‘little’ death – his child – as of the mass deaths he would have been exposed to at the front. It is Margaret who forces Chris and Jenny to acknowledge that death in order to work the ‘cure’. She is the cause and the catalyst – the most active participant in every encounter.

The final character of note is the psychiatrist. I found this section the most interested and frustrating. I have some *issues* with Freud and his idea of psychoanalysis, which was clearly very popular at the time. Suddenly, there was an impartial judgement and I personally felt that he was a little hard on Kitty. I also found it interesting that the ‘ordinary’ Margaret was the one best positioned to understand his implications – she had more real world experience than either of the other ‘ladies’.

It was only at this point that I learned that there might have been a bit of bitchy vibe at the core of the books DNA. Apparently, Rebecca West had been involved with the married HG Wells. Within the book, Jenny represents Rebecca West and Kitty Mrs Wells. Suddenly the doctor’s judgements seemed even more harsh!

A very successful book for our little group – as is reflected in the score. We also noted that it was a true delight to read a Great War based book  with the war as a backdrop and the subject the women of the time.

View the trailer for the 1982 film here!

SCORE –

8.5/10

Find fellow members on twitter by searching for #LBC3Reads.
Follow @Cafe164 for details on the deliciousables!
 
Let me know your thoughts by either tweeting me @LeedsBookClub, commenting below or emailing me at leedsbookclub@gmail.com


BOOK CLUB MEET UP PAGE

LBC 3 Reads – Book 11 – Giovanni’s Room by James Baldwin

#LBC3Reads
Date:  16th of May 2015
Time:  11am – 1pm
Address: Unit 2
Munro House,
Duke St,
Leeds LS9 8AG

 

 

DISCUSSED – 

GIOVANNI’S ROOM
JAMES BALDWIN

BLURB

When David meets the sensual Giovanni in a bohemian bar, he is swept into a passionate love affair.

But his girlfriend’s return to Paris destroys everything.

Unable to admit to the truth, David pretends the liaison never happened – while Giovanni’s life descends into tragedy.

giovannis roomWe had no sooner closed the book on The Return of the Soldier than it was time to get started on Giovanni’s Room – as different a book as can be imagined! In fact, the only trait that they share is that neither are particularly big books, yet both are powerfully written.

In fact, as we chatted, we agreed that the closest book thematically that we have collectively read was The City and The Pillar – a considerable different book, time frame and attitude – but still comparable due to its focus on emerging sexuality and social alienation.

For the second time that morning, we marveled at the skill of the author in creating a world and social setting so quickly. At times bright and gleaming, at others dank and sleazy; in a matter of pages, the scene was set.

Once established, the characters drove the plot forward. David – our ‘protagonist’ had no self awareness. All but engaged, he seemed not to hesitate when Giovanni entered the scene, though this clearly affects his sense of self and identity. He was in denial of his sexuality and utterly selfish in his motivations.

This contrasted greatly with the eponymous Giovanni who appeared at first glance to be confident and self assured. However, as the novel progressed, each character followed very different paths. Giovanni, for all his bravado was vulnerable. Once the balance of power at work shifted and his popularity faded; he was fired and publicly shamed – which utterly crushed him. At the time he most needed support, Helen returns and David begins to withdraw from him, resulting in a meltdown.

David – who at any point would be able to go home and escape his situation – was unable to reconcile his sexuality with societal expectations and uses several characters, with an awareness that he *should* have felt remorse for it…but didn’t. He also appears completely taken aback when his girlfriend returns…despite IT ALWAYS BEING OBVIOUS THAT SHE WOULD. The women featured in the book are agents for the male characters growth and less developed but still well crafted. Helen’s instinctive dislike and distrust of Jacques demonstrated a greater awareness of their social world than David – but she is relatively powerless to change anything, due at least in part to her gender. We none of us particularly warmed to her, though funnily enough all agreed that she and Giovanni were both betrayed by David. I had thought that we would ‘prefer’ Giovanni due to his greater presence, but I think Baldwin’s writing was too good to allow it.

Giovanni’s neediness, coupled with David’s lack of conviction made them somewhat unsympathetic characters. Indeed, the closest that the story comes to a sympathetic character is Jacques – especially in relation to Giovanni. Giovanni’s decline is all seen from David’s perspective so it’s difficult to know if his perspective tempered events.

For the majority of us, this was our first James Baldwin book. He seems to have been a fascinating man and we will definitely be seeking out his other writings in the future.

SCORE –

8/10

Find fellow members on twitter by searching for #LBC3Reads.
Follow @Cafe164 for details on the deliciousables!
 
Let me know your thoughts by either tweeting me @LeedsBookClub, commenting below or emailing me at leedsbookclub@gmail.com


BOOK CLUB MEET UP PAGE

LBC 3 Reads – Date Change – PLEASE NOTE

#LBC3Reads
Date:  *22nd of August 2015*
Time:  11am – 1pm
Address: Unit 2
Munro House,
Duke St,
Leeds LS9 8AG

 

Our Choice

I KNOW WHY THE CAGED BIRD SINGS

MAYA ANGELOU

lbc 3 01BLURB (from Amazon)

Maya Angelou’s seven volumes of autobiography are a testament to the talents and resilience of this extraordinary writer. Loving the world, she also knows its cruelty. As a Black woman she has known discrimination and extreme poverty, but also hope, joy, achievement and celebration. In this first volume of her six books of autobiography, Maya Angelou beautifully evokes her childhood with her grandmother in the American south of the 1930s. She learns the power of the white folks at the other end of town and suffers the terrible trauma of rape by her mother’s lover.

‘I write about being a Black American woman, however, I am always talking about what it’s like to be a human being. This is how we are, what makes us laugh, and this is how we fall and how we somehow, amazingly, stand up again’ Maya Angelou

ABOUT THE AUTHOR (from Amazon)

Dr Maya Angelou was one of the world’s most important writers and activists. Born 4 April 1928, she lived and chronicled an extraordinary life: rising from poverty, violence and racism, she became a renowned author, poet, playwright, civil rights’ activist – working with Malcolm X and Martin Luther King – and memoirist. She wrote and performed a poem, ‘On the Pulse of Morning’, for President Clinton on his inauguration; she was given the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Obama and was honoured by more than seventy universities throughout the world.

She first thrilled the world with I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (1969). This was followed by six volumes of autobiography, the seventh and final volume, Mom & Me & Mom, published in 2013. She wrote three collections of essays; many volumes of poetry, including His Day is Done, a tribute to Nelson Mandela; and two cookbooks. She had a lifetime appointment as Reynolds Professor of American Studies at Wake Forest University of North Carolina. Dr Angelou died on 28 May 2014.

Date:  *14th of November 2015*
Time:  11am – 1pm
Address: Unit 2
Munro House,
Duke St,
Leeds LS9 8AG

 

Our Choice

THE TIN DRUM

GUNTER GRASS

lbc 3 02

BLURB (from Amazon)

On his third birthday Oskar decides to stop growing. Haunted by the deaths of his parents and wielding his tin drum Oskar recounts the events of his extraordinary life; from the long nightmare of the Nazi era to his anarchic adventures is post-war Germany

ABOUT THE AUTHOR (from Amazon)

Günter Grass, born in Danzig in 1927, is Germany’s most celebrated contemporary writer. He is a creative artist of remarkable versatility: novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, graphic artist. Grass was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1999.

Breon Mitchell’s translations include works by Franz Kafka, Heinrich Boll, and many others. He is the recipient of several awards for literary translation, he is Professor of Germanic Literature at Indiana University, and Director of the Lilly Library.

 

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